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Learn Polish with Rosetta Stone

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Rosetta Stone Polish
Online Subscription

 

Rosetta Stone Polish
for the Desktop

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  •  
    (23)
  • Ideal for learning Polish on the go
  • Unlimited access for 3, 6, 12, or 36 months
  • Use on computer, tablet or smartphone
 

  •  
    (618)
  • Ideal for learning Polish at home
  • Unlimited access for you and your family
  • Available as a CD-ROM or Download
Rosetta Stone Polish
Rated 4.4/5 based on 29 reviews

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Learn Polish on the go :

Take your pick from a range of FREE online language learning Apps:

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*Online Subscription & online services are accessible for one user aged 13 and up. 12-month initial term commitment and autorenewal.

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The Rosetta Stone difference.
And promise.

Rosetta Stone was founded on two concepts. The first is that learning a language
should be a natural, intuitive process. The second is that interactive technology has the power
to accelerate, personalize and simplify language learning for anyone at any age.

It simply works.

  • Learn Polish at
    your own pace
  • Chat with
    expert tutors
  • Connect with
    other learners
  • 30-Day Money
    Back Guarantee

Our exclusive techniques unlock the natural language-learning abilities in everyone.
Today they are used by millions of learners worldwide. But the only experience that really matters is yours.
So set your goals, then trust us to help you achieve them.

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Polish fun facts

Polish is the official language of Poland and the native langauge of nearly 40 million people. There are big Polish-speaking communities in Argentina, Australia, Belarus, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Lithuania, the UK, Ukraine, the United States, and Russia. Learn More

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Why should you
learn Polish?

 

About the Polish language

Polish is the official language of Poland and belongs to the Lethitic subgroup that's within the West Slavonic group of languages. There are about 40 million speakers of Polish in Poland, Lithuania, and Belarus—and large communities of speakers in the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Ireland, and Brazil.

Polish grammar and pronunciation

Polish uses Latin script with the addition of nine letters: (ą, ć, ę, ł, ń, ó, ś, ź, ż). Grammatically it has a relatively free word-order format with the dominant word arrangement of subject-verb-object, like many other languages, including French, German, and English. It can be one of the more difficult languages for English speakers to take on, given its complex gender system, added symbols, and tongue-twisting pronunciation. (Don't worry! We'll help you with Rosetta Stone's proprietary speech-recognition technology.)

Polish language history and culture

The official language of Poland, standard Polish has become considerably more widespread throughout the country than it was before World War II. The people of Poland adopted Latin Catholicism in 966, and with their new religion came Latin, one of the many languages that have had an influence on the Polish language. Since the fall of Communism, Polish has borrowed heavily from English and now, in the information age, new terms in European languages, including English, are becoming commonplace in sports, the arts, and technology.

Fun facts about the Polish language

There are some tasty and surprising Polish words that are familiar to English speakers, including gherkin, kilbasa, and schmuck, which is often mistakenly thought to be of Yiddish origin.

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