Prospero: Digging for Buried Treasure in Rosetta World

prospero 2A few weeks ago, our game-development team launched Prospero, a Rosetta World game in which you search for buried treasure on a desert island. You use grammar and pronunciation skills you’ve learned in Rosetta Course to interpret visual clues and correctly speak phrases in order to dig for buried treasure. This is the first game that uses our world-class, speech-recognition technology.

To get started, you can spend some time familiarizing yourself with Prospero in Solo mode and then jump into a competitive treasure hunt with another learner in Duo mode. Prospero gives you the opportunity to practice speaking in a two-player game, without speaking directly to another learner. Once you gain a little more confidence, you can progress to one of our conversational games, like Identi or Chatonium.

A grammar matrix is a classic language-learning tool that enables you to explore the full breadth of a specific grammatical concept, such as verb conjugation. Prospero leverages this tool in a way that’s fun, engaging, and decidedly Rosetta Stone. The underlying content model is a grammar matrix with visual clues along the x and y axes. You get to combine those clues to come up with the phrase located at a particular position on the grid. Now we’re having fun! If you need some help, the game will show you the text and then play the voice of a native speaker saying the phrase.

We hope you’ll enjoy this fun new way to practice your language skills in a casual game setting. Prospero is currently available for learners of Latin American Spanish. If you’re learning another language, keep an eye out for Prospero in Rosetta World soon. Don’t forget to leave feedback so we can continue to improve Prospero and our other language games.

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Chris Karas

Chris leads the Software Development group in our Arlington, VA office. He has been focusing on recruiting top talent for new development teams and leading the game development efforts for Rosetta World and RWorld. Prior to joining Rosetta Stone in 2005,Chris developed embedded software for military aircraft, including the Black Hawk Helicopter and the Gripen Fighter Jet. He holds a BS in Computer Science from Binghamton University and an MBA from Dowling College.
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